Nepal earthquake: in pictures

The British Red Cross didn’t hesitate to launch an emergency appeal following yesterday’s devastating earthquake. These ten photos help explain why.

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1. The earthquake claimed thousands of lives and destroyed around 5,000 buildings. It is feared many people may still be trapped under the rubble.

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2. From the moment the earthquake struck, Red Cross volunteers were out in the streets looking for trapped survivors and helping casualties. More

Disease, war or drowning – could you choose between them?

A queue of men stood by a ship

© Damian Fulton Naylor/IFRC

What would persuade you to board a creaking, overcrowded boat for a voyage you know might kill you?

Make you hand over thousands of dollars to gangsters and middle-men for the privilege? Convince you take such a terrible risk?

More than a thousand migrants have died crossing from Africa to Europe in the last few weeks. The Red Cross has been on the front line helping survivors.

More people will attempt the crossing today. Some may have set off in the last few hours, fearing their flimsy boat could sink in the time it takes you to read this story.

Survivors have described the harrowing scenes when boats do capsize. Doaa, a Syrian teenager, told Channel 4 News: “People died in front of me. I started to move the corpses with my hands just to reach the living.” More

Nurse’s First World War diary: treating Gallipoli’s wounded men

Recruitment poster for volunteers from the First World War“When one takes a walk one always meets with the same thing: yells, smells, bells.”

Louisa Higginson kept a diary of her work as a British Red Cross nurse in the First World War. Louisa left her family in New Zealand to volunteer at hospitals in Malta and Egypt. On the 100th anniversary of the battle of Gallipoli, her diary reveals the sights, sounds and smells of hospital life as she treated wounded soldiers from the battle. More

Teacher, dog saver – and London Marathon runner

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This weekend, Demelza will take on the London Marathon. While training, she’s faced everything from rescuing a dog to restarting a woman’s heart.

Demelza, 34, insists she was completely unfit. She is definitely not, what they call, ‘a runner’.

But she’s come a long way – soon it will be 26 miles, in fact.

As we gear up to Red Cross Week 2015, we ask: what made her take on one of the biggest running challenges on the planet? More

13 things you didn’t know about the world’s newest nation

South SudanIn South Sudan, where conflict is having a devastating effect, you can still find natural wonders, wrestling fanatics and a rich culture. Take a journey round this vast new country…

1. South Sudan is home to the Sudd, one of the world’s largest wetlands. During the rainy season, it can cover an area of more than 130,000 square km (50,200 square miles) – roughly the size of England.

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Violence pushes Yemen’s water supply closer to the brink

A concrete tower in the desert

© ICRC

As fighting rages in Yemen, water networks have been disrupted by long and frequent power cuts – bringing more misery for the country’s people.

Damaged pumps and pipes make people turn to dirty, disease-carrying water, or leave them without anything to drink at all.

This would be a terrifying prospect in any country. But Yemen has been on the brink of a water crisis for years – if the supply dries up further, the results could be catastrophic.

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Asylum in the UK – adding up the true costs

Asylum seekers are called a lot of things in the press: freeloaders, scroungers, here to suck this country dry. So are we really the ‘El Dorado’ of Europe – a place of riches and gold that people flock to in droves?

If you feel like we give away too much of a good thing, then let’s take a moment to go through the bill.

Check, please! It’s time to get the story straight.

MythBuster notadreamcometrue More