Diana Shaw

Diana writes on Asia, the Middle East and all things Red Cross.

Posts by Diana Shaw:

Iraq’s forgotten children looking for home

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In Iraq, three girls sit on the ground in Khazer camp with Red Cross and Red Crescent food parcels

© IFRC/Safin Ahmed

These children should be at school. Instead, they spend their days behind a wire fence.

Since October, over 200,000 people have fled fighting in Mosul, Iraq.

As of February, over 152,000 people still can’t go home.

That’s almost as many people as live in Brighton in the UK.

It’s even more shocking that around half of those people are children.

The conflict destroyed their homes, devastating whole neighbourhoods.

Many families have taken refuge in Khazer camp, about 50 miles from Mosul.

Life here is busy and cramped. Since the battle for Mosul started, the camp’s population has swelled to more than 30,000 people.

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In pictures: Aleppo evacuation

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Red Cross and Red Crescent teams walk in Aleppo, Syria, with damaged buildings surrounding them

© Sevim Turkmani/ICRC

Over the course of four days, the Red Cross and our partners the Syrian Arab Red Crescent have evacuated 25,000 people from eastern Aleppo.

Starting before dawn on 15 December, a convoy of buses and ambulances made several trips into the hard-to-reach areas of the city, in northern Syria.

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Yemen: the human cost of conflict

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A young girl in Yemen stands in darkness but smiles at the camera

© ICRC/Mohammed Yaseen

At six years old, Soria is too young to understand why her family had to flee their home in Yemen.

“I managed to bring along one of my toys,” she said.

“But I don’t know the fate of my other toys.”

Escaping bombing and fighting, Soria and her family are among 2.2 million people who had to abandon their homes in Yemen’s ongoing conflict.

Many buildings have been reduced to rubble. Others are now simply too dangerous to live in.

Yet even in the midst of all this, most people are just trying to keep going.

Here are a few of their stories.

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Syria crisis: ten snapshots from Aleppo

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A boy stands in a concrete room holding a box of hot food and surrounded by men sitting on the floor

© ICRC/Sana Tarabish

Right now, families from Aleppo are fleeing for their lives. At least 40,000 to 50,000 people have left their homes because of fierce fighting in the past few days.

Around double that number have been forced to leave home since August. Most now live in difficult conditions as winter sets in.

Here are a few of their stories.

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How Victoria Beckham’s shoes helped build a new future in the Philippines

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A boy looks out of the window of a house built by the Red Cross recovery programme in the Philippines

When the sun shines, rural Iloilo can feel like a tropical paradise. But when Typhoon Haiyan ripped into it, this province of the Philippines was anything but.

On 8 November 2013, Typhoon Haiyan, one of the largest storms ever to make landfall, killed 6,300 people and left four million homeless.

As soon as we heard the news, people in the UK were ready to help.

Over the next few months, our supporters raised a staggering £13 million for the British Red Cross.

Three years later, recovery from the typhoon is complete in Iloilo and people have been left better able to cope with future storms.

Here is how you – and Victoria Beckham – helped to rebuild communities.

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Soap, ambulances and 32,000 loaves of bread: the kit that’s ready to help the people of Mosul

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iraq-men-wait-with-relief-supplies

Approximately a million people are trapped in Mosul, Iraq by a battle being fought around them.

This is roughly equal to the population of Birmingham.

Having lived under siege for two years, thousands face shortages of food, water and medical care. Some have already started fleeing to safety while others may hold out at home until the fighting ends.

Almost all will need help as soon as we can reach them.

The British Red Cross is part of the worldwide Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement. Working with our partners, we are ready to help people as soon as they escape Mosul – or the fighting ends.

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