Ros Knight

Ros ensures that all our information is accurate, well-written, fair, and easy to find on the internet.

Posts by Ros Knight:

One mother’s tragic story – and her message for every parent

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Kim Hunter’s two-year-old son Rocco died after a febrile seizure. Now Kim wants to share her experience to make sure all parents and carers learn some first aid.

Toddler running through grass

Rocco

“Rocco was an incredibly energetic, active boy. He got bored easily. He liked to be outside and helping me to walk the dog.

“The first time he had a febrile seizure I had no idea what was happening. He was 14 months old at the time. We were in a shop and he suddenly went stiff and his eyes rolled back. More

It’s not just the man on the moon who needs a friend this Christmas

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Artwork showing two children trying to reach the moon with a ladder

Image by Philip Edmondson

Have you seen the John Lewis Christmas advert? It’s the heartwarming story of a little girl befriending the lonely man on the moon. It’s a reminder that this is the perfect time of year to bring some comfort and joy to people’s lives. But the good news is, you don’t have to go the moon (or even buy a gift) to help lonely people. There’s something you can do in your own community – and it’s totally free…

Barbara knows what it’s like to feel lonely. She spent time in hospital after a nasty fall. When she was finally allowed home, her joy at leaving hospital was mixed with sadness that she had to return to an empty house.

“I didn’t know whether to laugh, cry or what. When you come to be on your own, it is awful. You think, well, nobody’s coming.” More

Advice for bonfire night: how to treat a burn

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Fireworks

iStock

If you’re heading out to see fireworks, have fun and stay safe with our top tips for treating a burn.

Most firework-related injuries happen at family parties or private events. Around half of those incidents involve children under the age of 17.

Our first aid guru Joe Mulligan says: “Fireworks are safe if carefully handled but we want to make sure people know how to help if someone does get burned.

“Most people don’t realize that sparklers reach temperatures five times hotter than cooking oil.” More

How to use a loo in 8 languages

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Family receive food parcel from Hellenic Red Cross“It’s weird. Tourists are walking down the street in shorts and bikinis, enjoying a pint by the sea. Then you turn a corner and you’re in a refugee camp.”

Aid worker Nigel McGrath has spent the last six weeks in Greece. Thanks to everyone who is donating to our Europe Refugee Crisis Appeal, he has been helping refugees who are struggling to cope.

“The island of Kos has a population of around 30,000 people. There used to be around five Red Cross volunteers there, who had never worked on a major crisis. Suddenly boats began to arrive. More

Help a heart

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Woman performing CPR on a man who is unconscious and not breathingIf you suffer a cardiac arrest in the UK and you’re not in a hospital, your chance of survival is less than one in ten.

When someone has a cardiac arrest, their heart stops completely. They collapse, lose consciousness and stop breathing. It’s really important to act fast. This is what you should do. 

HOW TO HELP SOMEONE WHO IS UNCONSCIOUS AND NOT BREATHING
  1. Check breathing by tilting their head backwards and looking and feeling for breaths.
  2. Call 999 as soon as possible, or get someone else to do it.
  3. Push firmly downwards in the middle of the chest and then release.
  4. Push at a regular rate until help arrives.

Giving chest compressions can keep casualties alive for those precious few minutes before help arrives. You’re pumping a small amount of blood around the body to keep the organs – most importantly the brain – alive. More

Strictly come dancing: 100 years of Red Cross dance

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Men in fancy dressStrictly fever is back and here at the British Red Cross, we love a bit of ballroom dancing. In fact, we’ve seen people hit the dance floor for over a century. From fundraising balls to hairy fairies and prisoner of war performances, join us for a waltz through the archives.

“Ballet Nonsense”

Our records show that many prisoners of war and internees turned to dance when they needed a little light entertainment. Many used their Red Cross food parcels to create props and costumes. More