Category: Appeals

10 photos from a forgotten crisis in Africa

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©MackenzieKnowles-Coursin/ICRC

Two-year-old Amahani, who has been sick for one month, rests in her hut – ©MackenzieKnowles-Coursin/ICRC

The crisis in Africa’s Lake Chad region continues to get worse and continues to be ignored.

These striking images give an insight into this vast emergency.

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How Victoria Beckham’s shoes helped build a new future in the Philippines

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A boy looks out of the window of a house built by the Red Cross recovery programme in the Philippines

When the sun shines, rural Iloilo can feel like a tropical paradise. But when Typhoon Haiyan ripped into it, this province of the Philippines was anything but.

On 8 November 2013, Typhoon Haiyan, one of the largest storms ever to make landfall, killed 6,300 people and left four million homeless.

As soon as we heard the news, people in the UK were ready to help.

Over the next few months, our supporters raised a staggering £13 million for the British Red Cross.

Three years later, recovery from the typhoon is complete in Iloilo and people have been left better able to cope with future storms.

Here is how you – and Victoria Beckham – helped to rebuild communities.

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Q&A – The Lake Chad crisis explained

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lake-chad-qa-1

Conflict, acute food shortages, disease and widespread displacement have conspired to leave millions of people in need of help in Africa’s Lake Chad region.

This dire humanitarian crisis has not happened overnight. Conflict has plagued the region for several years. People in Nigeria, Cameroon, Chad and Niger are all suffering the consequences.

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From the deck of our rescue boat – a young man from Gambia

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boy on the deck on the Responder

“I lost my mother in 2009 when I was 10,” says a young man from Gambia, “then my father in 2014.”

“I have five younger brothers and sisters so I have to take care of them.

“I wanted to work the land but after my father died, other family members took our farm. I left school and worked as a goat herd. But it’s hard.

“When my uncle offered to pay for me to go to Europe, I thought it’s a good idea. But first I had to go from my home in Gambia to Libya.

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From the deck of our rescue boat – naming a baby

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Jamal Agboola-Muideen

“My youngest baby is three months old. I’ve never seen him. But I gave him my name because maybe I won’t survive,” says Jamal Agboola-Muideen, 39.

“Going from Nigeria to Europe isn’t easy, through the land and through the sea. We lost a lot of people from the boat. I could have been among them.”

Jamal Agboola-Muideen is the breadwinner for his extended family and says he was forced to flee after his parents died when he received death threats from relatives wanting their land.

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Cholera Q&A – The deadly disease explained

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cholera-getty

Millions of people across the world contract cholera every year. Estimates suggest that more than 100,000 lives are lost every year to the disease.

The destruction and flooding caused by Hurricane Matthew in Haiti has led to fears that there could be a deadly surge in cases.

In this blog, British Red Cross health adviser Greg Rose explains the threat posed by this potentially life-threatening disease.

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From Calais to the UK – a view from the window

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Grande-Synthe-Aram.2

As the light again began to stream through the windows of the bus, one word above the rest was audible from the boys who sat quietly in nervous anticipation: “England?”

14 boys, mostly Afghans and Syrians, had arrived.

They are the first of the unaccompanied children living in Calais the Home Office has agreed to transfer to the UK.

The next week should see many more bus journeys like this one: many more packets of crisps and cheese sandwiches consumed; more vulnerable children glimpsing the British Isles for the first time.

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From the deck of our rescue boat: a panic attack

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man suffers panic attack on board the Responder

As the Responder search and rescue ship docks in Augusta, Sicily, a young man collapses, shaking.

Brunella Pirozzi, the doctor in the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies team checks him. It’s a panic attack. The team leads him to a seat and stays with him until he calms down a little. Bit by bit, the 22-year-old unclenches his fists and begins counting on his fingers.

“My two brothers. My mother. Killed in front of my eyes. Then they came for my sister.”

He pulls the neck of his shirt down to show a red scar.

“They stabbed me when I tried to stop them from taking her. I played dead so they didn’t kill me too.”

After fleeing for his life, the young man pays traffickers in Libya for a place on a boat to Europe. Just outside Libyan coastal waters, his boat is intercepted by the joint Red Cross and MOAS (Migrant Offshore Aid Station) operation.

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