Emergencies

Five steps to stop Ebola – in pictures

©IFRC/VictorLacken

©IFRC/VictorLacken

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa has claimed nearly 5,000 lives since March. The Red Cross has been tackling the outbreak since the outset.

These striking images from Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, show Red Cross workers on the ground fighting the disease and the people they are trying to help.

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The A&E team: always on call

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Smiles ahead: Roxane Dacey, staff nurse Corrina Newman and Zaneta Podgorska.

Our crack team is easing the pressure on over-worked staff at a busy hospital, while ensuring patients get the individual attention they deserve.

It’s no secret that life is incredibly busy at an accident and emergency (A&E) department.

British hospitals are famously struggling to cope with ever-rising numbers of patients, and A&E departments are typically in the eye of the storm.

But now doctors and nurses at one Swansea hospital are breathing a little easier, after the British Red Cross set up a support service right in the heart of the building. More

Fighting Ebola: “I’ve never experienced anything like this”

p-SLE0632Ebola has claimed nearly 5,000 lives across Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia and Nigeria. The outbreak is getting worse. John Punter, from Bristol, has been in Sierra Leone for two months. The 59-year-old describes his experience of fighting Ebola and how we can stop the spread of the deadly disease.

Before coming to Sierra Leone, my eldest son asked me: “Do you know what you’re getting yourself into?”

If truth be told, I didn’t – no one did. Worse still, it has taken the world even longer to wake up to the grim reality of this Ebola outbreak.

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Cardiac arrest runner gets lucky escape

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Sean Deans with first aid volunteers David Hart and Steven Gay. PIC: Alasdair MacLeod

When a young athlete collapsed at the end of a half-marathon, our cool-headed volunteers saved his life.

It was only as he crossed the finish line that Sean Deans realised all might not be well.

The 29-year-old, who had just completed the Great Scottish Run, recalled: “I just felt as if I needed to catch my breath. Next thing I know, I woke up in an ambulance.”

It turns out the army reservist had suffered cardiac arrest. As he lay there on the ground in Glasgow, he actually ceased breathing and his heart stopped. There seemed little hope. More

Ebola myths put lives in danger

IMG_2280Internet rumours claim the Red Cross is deliberately giving Ebola to people in West Africa. This is not true.

Every day, Red Cross staff and volunteers – most of whom are from the countries affected by the outbreak – risk their lives to help prevent the spread of the disease. Their only focus is fighting a virus that has caused thousands of deaths and placed many more people in danger. More

Surviving Ebola: Red Cross discharges first two patients from Sierra Leone treatment centre

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Osman and Kadiatu, pictured centre, holding their discharge papers

When the Red Cross opened a treatment centre recently in Sierra Leone, Osman Sesay was the second confirmed Ebola patient to arrive.

When he crossed the threshold of the Kenema centre, he was listless and lethargic, with the glazed-over look of someone infected with the deadly disease.

Over the course of the past two weeks, Osman watched 11 fellow patients being taken for burial in the newly-dug cemetery, while he continued to grow stronger. He interacted with staff more, he moved more, he began asking for more food.

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Nepal’s solar-powered blood bank will save lives after deadly earthquakes

©NRCS

©NRCS

How will a ground-breaking blood bank, made from shipping containers and using solar panels, save lives after earthquakes in Nepal?

Nepal’s capital Kathmandu is at high risk of being devastated by a major earthquake. Such a disaster could injure more than 300,000 people, and leave more than a million homeless.

This year the Nepalese Red Cross Society is building an innovative new blood bank with help from the British Red Cross, as part of a huge project helping the city and its people prepare for earthquakes. It will collect and store blood from the day it opens, ensuring a supply is available the second a disaster happens. More