Category: First aid

A tale of many blood pressures on the A421

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Well, my Grass Track duty at the weekend proved eventful. Not only did I get to witness the fastest Mini on grass, I also dealt with my first on-the-road incident in the back of one of our ambulances.

Man holding Oxygen mask

My crew mate and I were on the way back from hospital with a couple of former casualties in tow. However, along on the A421 near Bedford – half way back to our base for the weekend – one of them took a turn for the worse. Richard, my crew mate (and esteemed mentor) thought it was casualty #1 feeling nauseous. Fat chance. More

How to call an ambulance

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Young driver calls an ambulance for an injured cyclist

© Thompson, Layton (BRC)

It seems simple. Dial 999/112*, give your address and wait for the ambulance. If only!

Calling for an ambulance can be a difficult experience, especially if the situation is stressful or someone you know is injured. I’ve put together a few tips from my personal experiences, and from speaking to those in the ambulance service.

I hope you never have to dial those three digits, but if you do, remember these simple things:

Try to speak clearly

Remember the operator can’t see the situation. They are relying solely on what you tell them, speaking clearly and explaining the situation will help them greatly. Try and give clear and concise answers to the questions they ask. More

Win the Good Food Guide 2010!

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This competition has now ended! Find out the winner and the answers.

Clearly,good_food_guide_2010-178865 if you’re reading this blog you are someone with exquisite taste – and such delightful people deserve a wee treat every once in a while. That’s why Quizmaster Cox is offering a free copy of The Good Food Guide 2010 (RRP £16.99) – the UK’s oldest and best-selling restaurant guide, published by Which?

Here’s how you win:

1. Take the quiz below.
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Map, compass…first aid skills

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Conwy Valley, North WalesFirst aid is one of those things most people don’t really think about…until disaster, or a fracture or sprain strikes. Then, they tend to hope and assume there’ll be someone else around who will be able to step in and save the day..and perhaps, save a life.

I was reminded of my near total ignorance of first aid (yes, I know I work at the Red Cross – my own first aid course is booked) last weekend.

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What's going to happen next?

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Hampshire First AidersThe alarm clock sounds at 6am

The Hampshire youth team are about to take part in a NAFAC. In a NAFAC? Yes a National First Aid competition.
As Chris has mentioned in his blog about last Saturdays event, the Hampshire NAFAC team consisted off young people aged ‘’between’’ 15-19.
This was the first time in many years that the competition has seen a team this young.

Age is just a number….. That sure didn’t stop our team in any way; we got on and dealt with the scenarios and everything that was thrown at us. Our team leader Charlotte Stevens kept the team spirit together throughout the 8 scenarios.

Whats going to happen next?

All of the eight teams that entered in this years competition where kept in secret of what the scenarios were about. We were held in a room with the other teams in the morning so we couldn’t see or speak to anyone else other than the other teams.
Each team was then collected from the room and were taken to a cordoned off area which was a scenario that the team had to deal with.

I am very proud of my team and our achievements. On several scenarios we got high points for casualty care but what mean the most to our team is our high points on leadership which gives the Hampshire team the strength to return back to NAFAC next year.

So although it’s in a year’s time, keep a look out for blogs on our achievements next year.

What’s going to happen next?

By

Hampshire First AidersThe alarm clock sounds at 6am

The Hampshire youth team are about to take part in a NAFAC. In a NAFAC? Yes a National First Aid competition.
As Chris has mentioned in his blog about last Saturdays event, the Hampshire NAFAC team consisted off young people aged ‘’between’’ 15-19.
This was the first time in many years that the competition has seen a team this young.

Age is just a number….. That sure didn’t stop our team in any way; we got on and dealt with the scenarios and everything that was thrown at us. Our team leader Charlotte Stevens kept the team spirit together throughout the 8 scenarios.

Whats going to happen next?

All of the eight teams that entered in this years competition where kept in secret of what the scenarios were about. We were held in a room with the other teams in the morning so we couldn’t see or speak to anyone else other than the other teams.
Each team was then collected from the room and were taken to a cordoned off area which was a scenario that the team had to deal with.

I am very proud of my team and our achievements. On several scenarios we got high points for casualty care but what mean the most to our team is our high points on leadership which gives the Hampshire team the strength to return back to NAFAC next year.

So although it’s in a year’s time, keep a look out for blogs on our achievements next year.

A competition like no other

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Beautiful weather graced Beaudesert Park Campsite in Staffordshire last Saturday. The sun was shining and not a cloud hung in the deep blue sky.firstaidernafac Sounds of laughter could be heard from the various groups of young people and adults enjoying a weekend away.

A group of yellow clad people appear, their hi-visibility clothing glinting in the sun. Suddenly screams ring out from an area of heathland. A man runs towards the group, covered in blood. “They’re coming back! They shot my friend! Help me please”.

Fortunately, the blood is fake and the screams come from well-rehearsed actors. The group are first aiders taking part in the National First Aid Competition 2009. As I explained in a previous post, this is an annual competition designed to find the best first aiders in the country!
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