Category: First aid

Dad saves son choking on 20p coin

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Ugo with his son Reuben. He used first aid when his son was choking on a 20p coin.Many of us will give our dads little tokens of appreciation to mark Father’s Day. But some of us may have more reason than others to express our thanks – like little Reuben.

After coming home from a family day out, dad Ugo had laid Reuben down to change his nappy – something he’d done hundreds of times before.

But unbeknown to Ugo, Reuben was holding on to a 20 pence coin his uncle had given to him as pocket money earlier on that day.

When Ugo turned his back, Reuben put the coin in his mouth – and started to choke.

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Why you have to call 999 the moment you suspect a stroke

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If you suspect stroke, call 999

We live in an era that values speed. These days you can have almost super-fast anything – from broadband to noodle soup.

It’s important to be speedy within the world of first aid too – especially when it comes to treating someone for stroke.

One stroke happens every three minutes and 27 seconds in the UK*. That’s about the same time it takes to microwave popcorn.

The good news is we can all very easily help someone having a stroke.

You just need to be able to spot it and call 999. Fast.

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Five ways runners could save the day with first aid

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Runners in a marathon

Whether you’re training for a marathon, a 10k or just enjoy the odd jog, as a regular runner you’re in a unique position to help others. But you might not be aware of it.

Being out and about early in the morning or in remote areas means you could be the first person to bump into someone in a first aid crisis. Would you be able to help?

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‘Knowing first aid helped me save a motorcyclist’s life’

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Helen Cowen used her first aid skills to save the life of a motorcyclist who crashed outside her home.Not everyone could handle the sight of a bloodied motorcyclist with a badly severed leg. Helen Cowen could, and her first aid knowledge saved a man’s life.

“I had decided to sit in the garden one evening when I heard a loud crash,” Helen said.

“At first I thought something had fallen off our recently renovated house. But as I walked to the front of the house, I could see a small crowd gathered on the pavement outside.”

The scene outside her house was upsetting.

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Act fast: first aid for treating babies and children with burns

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Little girl reaches for a pan on a hobEvery year thousands of children are treated for burns in hospital. It’s an incredibly common injury – especially for under-fives. That’s why all parents and carers need to know how to treat a burn or scald.

If you’ve ever spilt a hot drink over yourself, you’ll know it can make you jump or yelp. Chances are a small spill won’t leave you badly hurt.

But babies and children have much more sensitive skin than you or I. So if they tip a hot drink over, it can be much more serious.  That’s why it’s important to know how to treat a burn or scald. More

The man who invented CPR

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Dr-James-Jude-BLOGDr James Jude died last week – but his pioneering medical work continues to save countless lives every year.

These days, pretty much everyone knows what you should do if someone collapses and stops breathing.

The signature CPR position (kneeling over someone and pushing rhythmically on their chest) is recognised across the world. It has featured in countless movies and TV medical dramas over the years.

It works, too. Giving simple chest compressions can keep casualties alive for those precious few minutes before professional help arrives. More

‘I survived the 7/7 bombings’

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Jacqui-Puttnam-pro-pic-BLOG

Stefan Rousseau/PA

After Jacqui Putnam was caught up in the London Bombings, we helped her deal with the harrowing experience. She became a first aid volunteer with us and has saved many lives. This is her story.

1. THE EXPLOSION

I was in the front carriage on the Edgware Road train when the explosion happened. The bomb was in the next carriage along.

A lot of things happened in a split second. There was a loud bang – a high-pitched crack – and a flash of light, which illuminated hundreds of tiny shards of glass in the air.

The force of the blast travelled forward along the train. I felt immense pressure on my left shoulder which pushed me violently forward in my seat. More