International

Red Cross puts menstruation on the curriculum

Menstrual-hygiene-day-Kenya

Menstruation matters. For menstrual hygiene day, we find out why understanding menstruation is so important by visiting a Kenyan school that has got pupils talking about the previously taboo subject.

Stood outside her classroom in the scorching midday sun, Betty Cherotich suddenly becomes very animated when I ask her about menstrual hygiene issues in her community.

“I used to hide my sanitary products from my husband,” she proclaims. “Even I didn’t know the full facts about menstruation.” More

What’s going on in Burundi? The crisis explained

Burundi civil unrest

Violence and flooding have left thousands of people in need of help in Burundi. Alessandro Bini, an aid worker with the Norwegian Red Cross, has lived in the central African nation for six years. Find out what he has to say about Burundi and how people are coping.

What is the situation today?    

What I see happening in Burundi today makes me very sad. There are several factors that have come together to create this crisis.

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Seven days that shook Syria

Syria-AleppoIt has been a traumatic week in Syria – more so than usual. Numerous attacks on hospitals in Aleppo have robbed people of vital health care and highlighted a flagrant disregard for humanitarian law.  Find out what happened and our response.

It began on 27 April with an attack on an Aleppo hospital and the death of a leading doctor that hit the headlines.

The Al Quds hospital in eastern Aleppo was completely destroyed. The hospital was supported by the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF).

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A side of the refugee crisis you don’t often see: What happens after a boat sinks?

volunteers retrieve body from beach

Here we are again.

Just over a year ago, Red Cross chief executive Mike Adamson warned about the lack of EU action on the migrant crisis. Now, once again, volunteers in Libya are recovering bodies from the sea.

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Yemen photography competition: a window for the world

Two children sit on dry ground looking into the camera and holding a jerry can

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Can you imagine what 14 million hungry people look like? That’s nearly twice the population of London, all feeling the pain and fear of hunger.

Maybe it’s easier just to picture two hungry children, like those in this photograph from Yemen, dirty and tired but full of life.

Right now, 14 million people in Yemen – over half the country’s population – don’t have enough food.

A photography competition may be the last thing you’d expect to find in the middle of this crisis, caused by a violent civil war.

But the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) in Yemen recently organised one.

Why? “The competition is a tool and window to show the world how the humanitarian situation is getting worse,” said Adnan Hizam from ICRC.

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Letters from a crisis: goodbye to new friends

boy

Having spent a month in a refugee camp in northern Greece, Gwen Wilson is now preparing to say goodbye.  

Some of her refugee volunteers have decided to apply for asylum in Greece. Others are still hoping the borders will open.

Writing to you for the final time, retired nurse Gwen gives her impressions on life on the front line of Europe’s refugee crisis.  

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Letters from a crisis: local help and a premature baby

mother and young child

How do you begin to organise a refugee camp?

Gwen Wilson has seen it all. After retiring as a nurse, she worked in Sierra Leone during the Ebola crisis. Now Gwen has swapped her life in Sheffield for a refugee camp in northern Greece.

Writing to you from Thessalonica, Gwen gives her impressions of life on the front line of Europe’s refugee crisis.         

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