Aid Work

Why we need money, not goods, for Nepal

Nepal-kid-and-babyWe’ve been inundated with kind offers of all sorts of goods in the past week – but however well-intentioned, such donations won’t help. In big disasters, money talks.

News of the Nepal earthquake was barely out before the first calls came in.

People across the country had been moved by the distressing scenes on television and wanted to help. Many wanted to donate goods to send overseas – sleeping bags, tents, children’s clothes, kitchen utensils and even food.

But while the Red Cross is grateful for these offers, such an approach won’t work. Here’s why: More

Nepal earthquake: story of a village

Boy-doorIn the remote village of Sathighar – four hours north of Kathmandu – almost every house was destroyed. A Nepal Red Cross team was the first to reach the scene since the earthquake struck.

Donate to the Nepal Earthquake Appeal.

Blue-skyIt’s difficult to overstate the severity of the situation. In this village, an overwhelming majority of people lost both their homes and livestock, and now have no way of getting food

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The Red Cross arrived to find a scene of utter devastation: 11 people had been killed and many were injured. The surviving villagers were desperate for help. More

Nepal earthquake: then and now

Nepal then and now BLOGAlmost every news outlet is calling this week’s earthquake ‘the worst disaster to hit Nepal since 1934’. But what exactly happened 80 years ago – and how did the Red Cross help?

There’s precious little good news coming out of Nepal this week.

The death toll is rising. Infrastructure is hopelessly compromised. Getting enough food, shelter and medical care to so many people is going to be a huge challenge.

But there are positives in even the grimmest situations. For one thing: modern communications and transport have transformed disaster response in recent years. More

Nepal earthquake: in pictures

The British Red Cross didn’t hesitate to launch an emergency appeal following yesterday’s devastating earthquake. These ten photos help explain why.

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1. The earthquake claimed thousands of lives and destroyed around 5,000 buildings. It is feared many people may still be trapped under the rubble.

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2. From the moment the earthquake struck, Red Cross volunteers were out in the streets looking for trapped survivors and helping casualties. More

Feeding families on the move in Iraq

  • Aid is loaded into lorries in Iraq Aid is loaded into lorries in Iraq
  • Aid distribution in Iraq Aid distribution in Iraq
  • Little girl carries water tanks in Iraq Little girl carries water tanks in Iraq
  • Iraqi Red Crescent aid distribution Iraqi Red Crescent aid distribution
  • Man collects aid in Iraq Man collects aid in Iraq
     

Violence in Iraq has forced hundreds of thousands of people to flee their homes. Many are making long journeys across the borders to escape the fighting. The Iraqi Red Crescent Society has been helping families on the move, providing vital food and water.

See them in action in these photos and make a donation to help bring food, water, shelter and healthcare to people affected by the violence.

World Humanitarian Day: Why we must protect aid workers

Red Cross and Red Crescent staff and volunteers in the Occupied Palestine Territory are undertaking vital humanitarian work. They are working to protect the lives of civilians – who make up a disproportionately large number of casualties in this conflict – in the spirit of the Movement’s Fundamental Principles.

On World Humanitarian Day, watch our video and see why it’s crucial aid workers around the world are allowed to work in safety.

Polio eradication in the Horn of Africa

Children in front of chalk markings, indicating the residence has received treatment during the polio vaccination programme in South Sudan.

Children in front of chalk markings, indicating the residence has received treatment during the polio vaccination programme in South Sudan.

Great strides have been made towards the eradication of polio in recent years, which is why an outbreak of the highly infectious viral disease in the Horn of Africa last year was met with such dismay. More