Category: UK

Post relating to the British Red Cross in the United Kingdom

A kitten called Nazia

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Gerald Green lives in a small cul-de-sac on the outskirts of Oldham.

After the death of his wife Gerald had relied on his cat, Lucky, to keep him company.

But when Lucky died, Gerald became increasingly isolated, and his health began to suffer.

That changed when he met Nazia Rehman, who works with the British Red Cross.

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“How a wrong number changed my life”: a disabled volunteer’s story

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Mark Belton, a disabled volunteer, wears a British Red Cross t-shirt and smiles

Mark Belton, Red Cross volunteer © British Red Cross

“I think back on how I felt six or seven years ago and so much has changed,” Mark Belton said.

Mark first noticed that his sight was getting worse in his teens. His mum, nan and sister all had an inherited eye condition called retinitis pigmentosa.

“By the age of 18 or 19 I knew I had it too.

“My eyesight was deteriorating,” Mark said.

“It was a real blow, it was half expected but it sort of knocks you back. I had just got my new job then as an upholsterer.”

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Living with loneliness as a refugee

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With all the stigma and stress refugees and asylum seekers face, loneliness is not seen as an obvious problem. It is.

There are many reasons refugees and asylum seekers experience loneliness. They have to contend with language barriers and cultural differences and are often separated from family and friends. They also often lack the income to be socially involved.

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How to volunteer to help your community in an emergency

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Community reserve volunteers at a response exercise in Southampton - ©BritishRedCross/Andrew Hasson

Community reserve volunteers at a response exercise – ©BritishRedCross/Andrew Hasson

An exciting new campaign launches this week and we need your help.

The British Red Cross is aiming to recruit 10,000 volunteers across the UK who can help out when disaster strikes their local community.

The ‘community reserve volunteers’ will work together as a team during major emergencies, such as flooding.

They could also help out during other incidents such as a terror attack, or a major fire.

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“How I helped my baby having a febrile seizure”

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Leanne Barnett and her daughter Maia, who had a febrile seizure

Leanne and her daughter Maia, © Dave Fleming/UNP

Would you be able to spot a baby or child having a febrile seizure?

Two thirds of parents surveyed said they did not know what a febrile seizure was, or how to recognise or treat one.*

Luckily for 18-month-old Maia from Swindon, her mum Leanne Barnett did know what to do.

Back when Maia was six months old, Leanne decided to take a baby and child first aid course with the British Red Cross.

It was a good decision. When Maia suffered a febrile seizure, Leanne was able to give her daughter exactly the help she needed.

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From pillowcase to grab bag: preparing youngsters for natural disasters

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©BritishRedCross/ChrisBull

Westholme Junior School – ©BritishRedCross/ChrisBull

The world is reeling from a series of devastating natural disasters. From Hurricane Harvey and the flooding in South Asia, to Hurricanes Irma and Maria.

We can’t avoid natural disasters, but through the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement we can help people prepare for them – such as by teaching people to have a grab bag ready.

When Hurricane Katrina hit in 2005, the American Red Cross noticed children using their pillowcases to carry their possessions to the rest centres.

Cue the Pillowcase Project: now even UK children are getting ready to face the worst with their pillowcase ‘grab bags’.

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From discussing beans on toast to campaigning against landmines, memories of Princess Diana’s work with the Red Cross

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Diana visiting children at Hindleap Warren in 1985

Diana visiting children at Hindleap Warren in 1985

Next week marks the 20th anniversary of Princess Diana’s tragic death. Throughout her life, the Princess was a dedicated humanitarian who championed causes in the UK and overseas. We look back on her journey with the Red Cross.

Princess Diana was always committed to using her public profile to bring about positive change.

A firm believer in the power of young people, she became patron of the Red Cross Youth in 1983, which gave her an increasingly visible role with the British Red Cross.

In July 1985, Diana visited a Red Cross adventure camp for disabled children at Hindleap Warren, in East Sussex.

Barbara Summerfield, 85, from Saltdean, was a youth officer at the time and has fond memories of Diana’s visit.

“What went down well, more than anything else, was that Diana was a real person who the children could talk to,” said Barbara.

Diana spending time with children at Hindleap Warren in 1985

Diana spending time with children at Hindleap Warren in 1985

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