UK

Post relating to the British Red Cross in the United Kingdom

‘Have yourself a very Red Cross Christmas…’

With only a month to go until the unwrapped pressies and stuffed turkey (and bellies), here are some ways to get into the festive spirit.

1. Buy our Christmas single

A bevy of music stars – going under the name The Peace Collective – have recorded The Farm’s 1990 hit song, All Together Now, to raise money for us. It’s released on 15 December.Xmas-single

Featured stars include Alexandra Burke, David Gray, Gabrielle, The Proclaimers, I Am Kloot, Holly Johnson, and band members from Massive Attack, Cast and The Sugababes. More

Meet Jess: the humble life-saver

Jess-Bradley-HCA-winner-BLOGJess Bradley has won a major award after saving the life of a man with a horrific injury – but she doesn’t see anything remarkable about her actions.

Today, Shetland Islander Jess Bradley was given a young heroes’ award by the British Red Cross.

And no wonder. Even a mere mention of the disturbing scene she had to deal with (helping a man with a deep gash in his neck) would be enough to make most people feel queasy.

But the trained first aider is surprisingly blasé about the whole incident. As she puts it: “I didn’t think it was anything remarkable – it was what I’d been trained to do, an instinct.” More

Dogs of war: the first aiders on four legs

DOGS-gas-mask-houndsDuring the First World War, the British Red Cross got lots of help from an unlikely quarter. As Armistice Day approaches, we sniff around for the full story.

At first, it sounds like a particularly far-fetched episode of Lassie.

A dog, you say, carrying first aid supplies through the whizzing bombs and flying bullets of no man’s land? And all to reach and save wounded soldiers? It sounds preposterous. But it’s true – every word of it. More

Katie Melua finds spider in her ear

Katie-Melua-BLOGThe singer was being driven the closest thing to crazy (sorry, couldn’t resist) by a scratching noise in her ear – until doctors made a grisly discovery.

Here’s a creepy-crawly tale to make your skin, well, crawl.

Katie Melua recently visited her doctor about a repetitive scratching noise in her ear that had persisted for a full week.

The songstress was concerned it might be an early sign of tinnitus, but instead the doctor found something altogether different – an incy wincy spider had set up home inside her head. More

Wheelchairs of World War One: the untold story

Wheelchair-WW1-amputee-BLOGYears before the NHS even existed, the British Red Cross was providing mobility aids and prosthetic limbs to injured soldiers. As our service celebrates its 100th anniversary, a new documentary explores the harrowing stories of the first people we helped.

If you’re free this Sunday evening, here’s an idea.

Grab a drink, park yourself on the sofa and check out Secret History: World War One’s Forgotten Heroes on Channel 4 (7-8pm).

This fascinating programme looks at the heart-rending experiences of almost two million British soldiers who suffered life-changing injuries and disabilities during the First World War. More

Halloween: a survival guide

Halloween-scary-kidsThe whole point of Halloween is to be a bit ghoulish, but it’s better if the blood remains fake and the looks of shocked horror are tongue-in-cheek. Here are some tips to keep you and your little monsters safe.

1. Pumpkin alert!

Everyone worries about the children at Halloween, but they’re generally not the ones wielding a sharp knife and trying to cut intricate holes into a big, slippery orange vegetable.

Halloweeen-pumpkinIn the USA last year (where pumpkin-carving is almost a national sport), around 4,400 people turned up at emergency rooms with genuinely scary injuries. Be careful, parents. More

The curious tale of the ‘black doctor of Paddington’

Dr-John-Alcindor-BLOGA determined doctor who overcame bigotry and prejudice to help others during the First World War has finally won recognition. As Britain celebrates Black History Month, we trace his story.

John Alcindor was a gifted doctor, respected and trusted by his many patients.

Originally from Trinidad, John graduated with a medical degree from Edinburgh University in 1899. He then worked in London hospitals for several years before going into practice on his own.

When the First World War broke out in 1914, he naturally wanted to use his skills to help with the war effort.

But despite his qualifications and experience, he was rejected outright by the Royal Army Medical Corps in 1914 because of his ‘colonial origin’.

More

The A&E team: always on call

Swansea-A&E-BLOG

Smiles ahead: Roxane Dacey, staff nurse Corrina Newman and Zaneta Podgorska.

Our crack team is easing the pressure on over-worked staff at a busy hospital, while ensuring patients get the individual attention they deserve.

It’s no secret that life is incredibly busy at an accident and emergency (A&E) department.

British hospitals are famously struggling to cope with ever-rising numbers of patients, and A&E departments are typically in the eye of the storm.

But now doctors and nurses at one Swansea hospital are breathing a little easier, after the British Red Cross set up a support service right in the heart of the building. More