Category: UK

Post relating to the British Red Cross in the United Kingdom

Meet Michael: Norwich City fan and super first aider

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British Red Cross first aider Michael Segon with Norwich City FC player Martin Olsson

Volunteers are the backbone of the British Red Cross. They never cease to amaze us with their dedication. But just when you think you’ve seen it all, you come across someone like Michael Segon.

Michael is one of our first aid volunteers. He recently celebrated a whopping 60 years of volunteering with the Red Cross.

Over the years he has provided first aid at a wide range of events in the Norwich area.

But his bread and butter has been the matches at Norwich City Football Club. He’s been on duty at more than 1,700 games.

Being a massive Norwich City fan, Michael has loved being able to combine his love for first aid with football.

And despite recently suffering a heart attack, Michael is determined to continue volunteering.

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Why ‘bed-blocking’ isn’t the real problem

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A woman lies in a hospital bed

Many patients are fit to leave hospital – but they can’t. Why? Because the right care and support isn’t available for them at home. They find themselves trapped in hospital beds – beds that are needed for new patients.

These people are commonly known as ‘bed-blockers’ – as if they themselves are the problem.

According to BBC analysis of NHS figures released today, more than one in 10 patients in England face long delays for a hospital bed after emergency admission.*

This is an issue. But let’s be clear – it is almost always never the fault of the patient. These delays are caused by pressure on health services and a lack of investment in care services for adults.

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One very big red weekend

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Mike Adamson Red Cross CEO at bake sale with Co-op staff from Malmsbury store as part of the Big Red Weekend.

A flurry of fundraising fun swept across the UK at the weekend as employees of The Co-operative Group marked this year’s Red Cross Week.

From bake sales to sponsored cycles, raffles to slime baths, Co-op staff were busy raising funds as part of our charity partnership to help tackle loneliness and social isolation across the UK.

Last month it was announced that The Co-op had already raised £1million towards this partnership – so we were excited to see what went down at Co-op stores all over the country for the Big Red Weekend.

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Celebrating nurses through the ages

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First World War Red Cross nurse lights a cigarette for a patientIt’s International Nurses’ Day: let’s celebrate the fantastic nurses who helped us treat Ebola, malaria – and flirty WW1 patients.

Florence Nightingale: no gossip

Florence Nightingale rose to fame after her work during the Crimean War. Like the British Red Cross today, she believed that every sick and injured person deserves help, no matter who they are or where they are from.

“A really good nurse must needs be of the highest class of character,” she wrote in 1881. More

Home from hospital: time for change

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Raymond Attrell with Anna Holecz

Raymond Attrell with British Red Cross support worker Anna Holecz.

The day you get the OK to return home after being in hospital, should be a really good day. So why are some people afraid to go home?

You’ve recovered. You should be feeling better, positive and confident that you can cope with life at home – with whatever support you have arranged.

But a report has revealed that’s not always the case. Vulnerable patients, often frail or elderly, are being sent home from hospital too early – afraid and with little support.

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“I will keep trying and I will break free”: One refugee artist’s long journey back to her easel

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drawing of weeping eye

“Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once we grow up.” 

This famous line of Picasso’s resonates with Mays Al Ameer more than most.

Her passion for drawing, indeed her whole childhood, was cut short when her family were taken hostage in Iraq.

Now settled in Poole, she is part of a Red Cross art group designed to encourage community ties and a sense of belonging.

We meet her at an exhibition of her work at the Poole Lighthouse to hear about what brought her to the south coast, as well as her hopes for the future. More

Bringing up a baby in a car: how our asylum system is failing families

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Red Cross volunteer speaks to Dilipa

Before the war life was good for Dilipa. She loves her country – the weather, the fresh produce, the lifestyle.

But after 2000, hostilities between the government and Tamil separatists increased. Life for ordinary Tamils in Sri Lanka became more and more difficult.

Members of Dilipa’s family were questioned and even tortured. They would get arrested for small things such as not having an ID card on them.

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