Category: Emergencies

In pictures: Aleppo evacuation

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A convoy of buses in the distance in front of bomb-damaged buildings in eastern Aleppo

© STRINGER @ Scanpix

Over the course of four days, the Red Cross and our partners the Syrian Arab Red Crescent have evacuated 25,000 people from eastern Aleppo.

Starting before dawn on 15 December, a convoy of buses and ambulances made several trips into the hard-to-reach areas of the city, in northern Syria.

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Yemen: the human cost of conflict

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A young girl in Yemen stands in darkness but smiles at the camera

© ICRC/Mohammed Yaseen

At six years old, Soria is too young to understand why her family had to flee their home in Yemen.

“I managed to bring along one of my toys,” she said.

“But I don’t know the fate of my other toys.”

Escaping bombing and fighting, Soria and her family are among 2.2 million people who had to abandon their homes in Yemen’s ongoing conflict.

Many buildings have been reduced to rubble. Others are now simply too dangerous to live in.

Yet even in the midst of all this, most people are just trying to keep going.

Here are a few of their stories.

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Syria crisis: ten snapshots from Aleppo

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A boy stands in a concrete room holding a box of hot food and surrounded by men sitting on the floor

© ICRC/Sana Tarabish

Right now, families from Aleppo are fleeing for their lives. At least 40,000 to 50,000 people have left their homes because of fierce fighting in the past few days.

Around double that number have been forced to leave home since August. Most now live in difficult conditions as winter sets in.

Here are a few of their stories.

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The nomadic tribe facing up to climate change in Namibia

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©NikkiBidgood/GettyImages

©NikkiBidgood/GettyImages

Climate change and El Niño have led to widespread drought across southern Africa. Remote tribal communities in Namibia are having to adapt their way of life to survive, as Luke Tredget reports.

When we landed in the Namibian capital city, Windhoek, it was hard to imagine we were in a country where the government had recently declared a state of emergency.

We encountered busy supermarkets, chain cafes, and all the vestiges of an advanced economy that you’d expect from a country that spent decades as a province of neighbouring South Africa.

But, as with so many places in Africa, it is a different story when you leave the capital. More