Category: Health

Cholera Q&A – The deadly disease explained

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cholera-getty

This blog was updated on 17 July 2017

Yemen is in the grip of an unprecedented cholera outbreak. Since April, there have been more cholera cases in Yemen than those reported in the whole world in 2015 – over 320,000 to date. More than 1,700 people have died.

The number of cholera cases in East Africa is also growing quickly. More than 17,400 people in South Sudan have been infected and at least 320 have died. Somalia is badly affected as well, with 53,000 cases this year and 795 deaths.

In this blog, British Red Cross health adviser Greg Rose explains the threat posed by this potentially life-threatening disease.

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Grants, ducks and cyclones: seven lessons from Bangladesh

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A man standing in a doorway holding a duck in each hand

What would you do if cyclones flooded the farmland you depend on every year?

Imagine living in an area that floods nearly every year.

For two to three months, you earn can no money and have to leave your home because it is surrounded by several feet of water.

Your house and farm animals can even get swept out to sea.

Despite working hard and saving between the cyclones, your family gets caught in this cycle year after year.

In 2013, the Red Cross, with our partner the Bangladesh Red Crescent, started supporting people in coastal villages in a new way.

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How the Red Cross and a typewriter turned things around for Jean

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Jean holding up some of the stories she has typed on her typewriter.

You know that old saying, ‘the straw that broke the camel’s back’? Well for 91-year-old Jean, that straw was a typewriter.

When Jean returned to her home in the Yorkshire Dales after a spell in hospital, she felt low and isolated.

So when her beloved typewriter broke too, an already difficult situation became a personal crisis.

“Everything seemed to go wrong for me,” Jean said.

Fortunately, our dedicated volunteers are skilled in all sorts of things – even fixing typewriters it seems.

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The power of a gran in Afghanistan

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Three women wearing Afghan Red Crescent pinneys and holding drawings of a mother and child sit on the floor in a row

If you were a granny in Afghanistan, you would be one of the most influential and respected members of your community.

“Afghan grandmothers are valued authority figures,” said Justin Dell, Afghanistan country manager at the British Red Cross.

“Many younger women in rural communities have to do what others tell them to do, particularly their fathers or husbands.

“But everyone will listen to grandmothers and follow their advice.

“This includes men, many of whom are the women’s own husbands, sons or sons-in-law.”

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Diabetes in a war zone: how the Red Cross helps in Yemen

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Close-up of Ayman, a boy with diabetes in Yemen

Ayman

What happens when you have diabetes and your country falls apart?

When your home is bombed, over half of hospitals and medical centres close and there is no clean water?

Living like this would be hard for anyone, but if your diabetes means you need insulin every day, it is catastrophic.

This is the situation in Yemen, where estimates say that 900,000 people have diabetes and most depend on insulin.

Yet a conflict that has been raging for more than 18 months has restricted entry of all medicine into Yemen.

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Students: Are you sure that’s freshers’ flu and not meningitis?

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A group of students are sat in a communal area of their accommodation. One of them is showing signs of meningitis.

The new academic term is a time for meeting fresh faces, getting to grips with new timetables… and freshers’ flu. But are you sure that’s what your flu-like symptoms are?

Students sometimes miss the signs of a much more serious illness known as meningitis because its symptoms are similar to that of freshers’ flu – the collective coughs, fevers and viruses caught during your first few weeks at university.

Meningitis is rare – but can be life threatening. Students are at more risk of it because they often live in close proximity to one another.

So if you’re heading to university this month, make sure you know the signs.

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The health and social care crisis: Joyce’s story

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Joyce Hall with a Red Cross volunteer who helped her regain her independence after she broke her arm Joyce waited an agonising two days before going to hospital with a badly broken arm. She couldn’t just go to the hospital – she had her younger brother to think about.

As the sole carer for Lenny, who has epilepsy and learning difficulties, she was worried about leaving him alone. He was unable to do everyday tasks like getting dressed and feeding himself.

But after two days of pain she had little choice.

The British Red Cross met Joyce for the first time when she was discharged from the hospital and referred to our support at home service.

We were able to help her not just through her recovery, but find more support for her and Lenny from other services in the long-term too.

But with six consecutive years of budget cuts and an increasing demand on health and social care services, the system in England has become unsustainable. The care people like Joyce and Lenny need, is at risk.

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Slime, mountains and miles: how far would you go to tackle loneliness?

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co-op_snowdon

Tackling loneliness is no mean feat. It’s a complicated and personal issue which can also carry an unfair degree of stigma. So where to start?

It’s been a year since the British Red Cross first announced we would be working in partnership with Co-op to help tackle loneliness and social isolation. By October, we were ready to get our partnership fully underway.

We started by looking at what we knew about loneliness, what we didn’t, and what we needed to. We involved other experts in this process along with people who have experienced loneliness.

Meanwhile Co-op rounded up its staff, members and customers to unleash what would become an incredible stream of fundraising activity.

And it turns out Co-op’s people are prepared to go pretty far to help tackle these issues.

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