From the deck of our rescue boat – a young man from Gambia

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boy on the deck on the Responder

“I lost my mother in 2009 when I was 10,” says a young man from Gambia, “then my father in 2014.”

“I have five younger brothers and sisters so I have to take care of them.

“I wanted to work the land but after my father died, other family members took our farm. I left school and worked as a goat herd. But it’s hard.

“When my uncle offered to pay for me to go to Europe, I thought it’s a good idea. But first I had to go from my home in Gambia to Libya.

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Soap, ambulances and 32,000 loaves of bread: the kit that’s ready to help the people of Mosul

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Approximately a million people are trapped in Mosul, Iraq by a battle being fought around them.

This is roughly equal to the population of Birmingham.

Having lived under siege for two years, thousands face shortages of food, water and medical care. Some have already started fleeing to safety while others may hold out at home until the fighting ends.

Almost all will need help as soon as we can reach them.

The British Red Cross is part of the worldwide Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement. Working with our partners, we are ready to help people as soon as they escape Mosul – or the fighting ends.

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A mapping revolution that is saving lives

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How can you improve women’s health in Guinea? Or help people in Haiti who have lost everything after Hurricane Matthew?

You could give to an emergency appeal to fund our life-saving work. But if you’re after something with a bit more direct involvement, then taking part in a mapathon could be the answer.

Missing Maps is a volunteer-led project that sees people from across the world create maps that could help people survive and recover from crisis. All you need is a laptop and an internet connection. More

From the deck of our rescue boat – naming a baby

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Jamal Agboola-Muideen

“My youngest baby is three months old. I’ve never seen him. But I gave him my name because maybe I won’t survive,” says Jamal Agboola-Muideen, 39.

“Going from Nigeria to Europe isn’t easy, through the land and through the sea. We lost a lot of people from the boat. I could have been among them.”

Jamal Agboola-Muideen is the breadwinner for his extended family and says he was forced to flee after his parents died when he received death threats from relatives wanting their land.

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Aberfan disaster: how Red Cross volunteers helped a community in shock

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British Red Cros teams unload supplies for Aberfan in 1966Even in the days before the internet, news spread fast when a small Welsh village was struck by tragedy in 1966. British Red Cross volunteers arrived in their hundreds to help the local community of Aberfan.

Fifty years after the disaster, read our report of the incident, written in the aftermath.

Disaster strikes

“On Friday October 21st, at about 9.15am, an 800-ft water-logged coal-tip slipped and descended 500 yards, down a mountain-side.

“In an avalanche of greasy slurry it engulfed a farmhouse, an infants and junior school and a terrace of houses in the small village of Aberfan, South Wales.

“The appalling death roll – to date 147, the majority being small children – shocked and stunned the entire world. More

From Calais to the UK – a view from the window

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As the light again began to stream through the windows of the bus, one word above the rest was audible from the boys who sat quietly in nervous anticipation: “England?”

14 boys, mostly Afghans and Syrians, had arrived.

They are the first of the unaccompanied children living in Calais the Home Office has agreed to transfer to the UK.

The next week should see many more bus journeys like this one: many more packets of crisps and cheese sandwiches consumed; more vulnerable children glimpsing the British Isles for the first time.

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